Phil Solomon

Phil Solomon

Phil Solomon is an internationally recognised filmmaker and has been teaching both film history/aesthetics and film production at CU (The University of Colorado Boulder) since 1991. Solomon’s work has been screened in every major venue for experimental film throughout the U.S and Europe, including 3 Cineprobes at the Museum of Modern Art and two Whitney Biennials. His films have won 10 first prize awards at major international film festivals for experimental film and reside in the permanent collections of the Museum of Modern Art, Massachusetts College of Art, Binghamton University, Hampshire College, The Chicago Art Institute, San Francisco State University, the University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee, and the Oberhausen Film Collection. Solomon collaborated on three films with his colleague and friend, Stan Brakhage, who named Solomon’s Remains to be Seen on his Top Ten Films of All Time for Sight and Sound.

In July 2013, Video Jam curated two of Solomon's films, Psalm III: “Night of the Meek” (2002) & Psalm II: “Walking Distance” (1999) for an event at the Islington Mill (04/07/13), both of which were scored live by the late Krautrock musician Dieter Moebius - a legendary artist in his own right. The films were screened in their original 16mm format, kindly sent in the post all the way from Colorado. Solomon's Twilight Psalms series is a personal "secret" history of the pains and horrors 20th century, with each title derived from an episode of The Twilight Zone, travelling beyond personal narrative to address the failings of history. The two films selected from the series showcase some of Solomon's finest examples of optical printing: Walking Distance uses footage of Harry Houdini to evoke the physical difficulty of escape, and Night of the Meek  links imagery from Paul Wegener's The Golem and James Whale's Frankenstein to that of the Holocaust.

A film digest of the event can be viewed here.